In 2012, Emily Blomberg was a new mother frustrated with the common one-piece children’s clothing designs that allow no access to a diaper without undressing. While on break from dental hygiene school, she designed and sewed a prototype of a new technology, one that is applied to the back of a baby onesie or footie pajamas, to solve this problem.

“It saves time, money and frustration of both mother and child,” said Blomberg.

Realizing that her idea was a success, Blomberg began researching patents and seeking advice on how to proceed with funding. Her online searches led her to SCORE, where she was assigned two mentors: Rob Posteluk and Jim Krueger.

“We have spoken over the phone together and emailed a lot,” said Blomberg. “We have been in contact once a month at least. My one mentor is really good about emailing each month to ask if he can help with anything or any updates.”

Now founder of Mom Made Peeks, LLC and technology “Caboosee,” and the holder of the rights to a US Utility Patent (something that is difficult to obtain), Blomberg is grateful for SCORE’s help.

“I think as a new business it is really helpful to get as much outside input as possible. People who aren’t family or friends might see things differently or be able to say things that need to be said that a family member wouldn’t,” she said, adding the Krueger and Posteluk have been a great resource.

“Both these men have more expertise in business finances than I. As my business moves forward I can see that their advice and knowledge will be very helpful,” she said.

“We discussed manufacturing of her baby garment, e-commerce promotion of product, and funding available to procure inventory, promoting product, angel funding, SBA, grants, and traditional bank funding,” added Krueger. “We suggested working with a domestic direct importing to get garments here - less administrative work than trying direct importing.”

Krueger and Posteluk also helped Blomberg discover a Wisconsin-only contest called HATCH, which gave her the opportunity to live-pitch her idea to an audience. Although she lost by three audience votes, she credits it as a great experience, and there is possibility she will get to pitch again in November for the finale.

“I’ve learned that you never know who has what connections or who knows who, so speaking with everyone possible about your business is very beneficial,” she said. “SCORE has many people that are willing to help, so why not take that opportunity?”

“I think the main reason why entrepreneurs should contact SCORE is that individuals can get free business people input for their issue,” added Krueger. “There are many resources on score.org for getting information: business plans, templates, workshops, webinars, etc.”

Blomberg is now a mother of three, and is currently searching for a manufacturer to work with and encourages anyone interested to contact her at emily@caboosee.com.